Wednesday, November 30, 2005

At The Other End of the Day

I was lucky, this morning, getting that spectacular sunrise. And also reminded of how badly I read the weather. This is something I'll need to get better at, if I want to get more of those really good images.

Attached is a picture I took in the Peak District this summer. I was there on a 2 day digital imaging course, and was out in the evening, nearby, looking for a nice sunset. I had taken a few to little effect, and was driving out by the humourously named Tittesworth Reservoir when I stopped to look at the sun setting nearby a local landmark called "The Cloud" - this is the long wedge-shaped peak in the distance. I thought the scene was nice enough, but then the sun went in behind the actual cloud, and produced, for about 20 seconds, the most dramatic scene ever - rays of light spilling out from behind the cloud, the colours intensified, and - with the sun now less of a direct light source - made the image possible to record in any detail. Again, I should have seen it coming...

I did process the image in Photoshop, slightly lightening the foreground and just balancing up the levels and colour saturation. I think it makes for a pretty special image.

Ivan

3 comments:

Critical Light said...

You're right. That is a special picture. It is so well balanced. The foreground is not too dark but not domineering, and leads you to the sky which is simply gorgeous.

Ivan said...

Thanks Damian. My only gripe with this picture is the plant sticking up in the front left of the picture. It crosses the fence, and is in direct line of the distant peak of interest. I may try and clone it out in Photoshop...
Ivan

Critical Light said...

Well I have two contrasting comments. First, I did not notice the plant. It's not ugly either. It also helps to provide a frame/border for the foreground and may actually help to bring the viewer to the sky. And it is very natural looking too. Secondly, if the plant is removed, it creates a slope upwards from the left foreground to the right midground which takes the viewer to the sky.

Damian